Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

His Fiancée Lost Her Memory, So He Waited 8 Years For Her To Remember Him.

Imagine that you're in the process of starting a new life! You've found your soulmate. You proposed and she accepted. Now you're ready to live happily ever after. But then, life throws a wrench in your plans and gives you a horrible disease. That's what happened to Hisashi Nakahara, 34, and his bride to be, 32-year-old Mai. A brain disease had robbed Mai of her memories of her future husband Hisashi, but he was definitely not willing to give up on her. And if you thought that the tale of Cinderella and Prince Charming was romantic, wait until you hear the one about Mai and Hisashi.

Hisashi Nakahara and his then-girlfriend, Mai, were two people hopelessly in love.

They spent so much time together that it only made sense that they would eventually get married. They had scheduled their wedding in Okayama for March 2007. The couple had dated for a year before Hisashi popped the question in July 2006.

Hisashi Nakahara and his then-girlfriend, Mai, were two people hopelessly in love.

On December 2006, everything had changed when Mai had suddenly started screeching at midnight.

She was not only using a strange voice, but had apparently lost her short-term memory as well, which prompted the couple to go to the hospital. But the doctors couldn't figure out what was causing Mai's symptoms.

On December 2006, everything had changed when Mai had suddenly started screeching at midnight.

While at the hospital, Mai's heart and lungs stopped working and she slipped into a coma.

She was eventually transferred to the Okayama University Hospital in Japan. After months of research, doctors assumed that Mai had contracted Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, an auto-immune disease that attacks the brain.

While at the hospital, Mai's heart and lungs stopped working and she slipped into a coma.

The symptoms of Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis occur in 0.33 percent per 1 million people.

Doctors began the appropriate medical treatments and her condition slowly improved. She even reacted to the voices of those closest to her.

The symptoms of Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis occur in 0.33 percent per 1 million people.

Over the next three years, Mai was able to express feelings and write her name using kanji characters.

By the spring of 2011, she was discharged from the hospital and by the time she was home, she was able to recognize members of her family. But there was one person that she was unable to recall, and it was the most important person in her life, her fiancé.

Over the next three years, Mai was able to express feelings and write her name using kanji characters.

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