Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

Archaeologists Reveal New Information About The Easter Island Statues.

New Pieces

With the help of technology, scientists have solved most mysteries, but there are still a couple of historical sites that have left humanity puzzled. This particular mystery has baffled scientists for several years, and there didn't seem to be a possible solution at all. But now, scientists have finally gotten their big break to help them solve the mystery of Easter Island.

New Pieces

Hetereki Huke's journey through the Chilean island wasn't just a simple holiday. Huke's legs were in pain from trekking across Easter Island's challenging landscape and he was now standing on the land that his ancestors set foot on centuries ago. He was surrounded by Monuments of the Rapa Nui. These gigantic monuments continued to fill him with wonder just like it did for anyone who was lucky enough to visit the aboriginal Polynesian inhabitants' home. But could anyone solve the big mystery?

It's A Long Story

It's A Long Story

Pierre Bouras Photographie / Facebook

How did the ancient Rapa Nui carve statues that weighed 86 tons and 10 meters in height? It's believed that the Rapa Nui created these monuments around 1400-1650 A.D. Even though they're known for the Moai heads, the land was neglected, leading to soil, rubble, dirt, grass, and weeds. But there's more to these heads lying beneath the very surface, waiting to be uncovered.

What Lies Beneath

What Lies Beneath

Many people have been misled to think that the carvings on the Statues of Rano Raraku volcano are mere heads. But actually, these heads have torsos, and some of them even have thighs. Some figures are complete and are kneeling on bent knees, while their hands protect their stomachs. Others sit back, seemingly enjoying their fame. Unfortunately, soil shifting has buried most of the statues, but the heads are pretty impressive on their own. But how did the aboriginal tribes manage to carve these landmarks on their own?

An Island Of Artists

An Island Of Artists

Hoteles / Facebook

The island was discovered a millennium ago by Huke's ancestors. The island is approximately 15 miles, and to this day, it's one of the world's most remote inhabited piece of land. Since metal hadn't been discovered yet, the aborigines had to use basalt stone picks to carve the volcanic ash, which had solidified. But why were the Moais unique?

In Honor Of Chieftains

In Honor Of Chieftains

Tours and Trekking / Facebook

Archaeologists assume that the Moai statues were built to honor the chieftains and other VIPs from Rapa Nui society, who had passed away. The Moais all had different characteristics from a large nose to a small nose, big ears to tiny ears, and prominent chins. The only thing they had in common was the size of their heads. But each sculpture represented a particular person, and the Rapa Nui had a difficult responsibility.

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