Sheyla

By Sheyla

LifeBuzz Staff

If You See A Purple Butterfly On A Baby’s Crib This Is What It Means.

One day a parent made an innocent remark to Smith.

Smith decided to make sure no other parent would ever have to go through that again.

One day a parent made an innocent remark to Smith.

Milli Smith

Smith designed a purple butterfly to be placed on a newborn's cots and incubators.

This explains to nurses, doctors, and other families that the baby was part of a multiple birth and one of the newborns did not survive.

Smith designed a purple butterfly to be placed on a newborn's cots and incubators.

Milli Smith

"I chose butterflies, as I felt it was fitting to remember the babies that flew away, the color purple because it is suitable for both boys or girls," Smith explains.

The sticker may seem simple but to grieving parents, it means the world to them.

"I chose butterflies, as I felt it was fitting to remember the babies that flew away, the color purple because it is suitable for both boys or girls," Smith explains.

Milli Smith

The Kingston hospital as well as many others in the United Kingdom have followed suit.

Smith and Cann have also set up the Skye High Foundation to provide bereavement counselors for parents who have lost a baby during pregnancy or after birth. She hope this foundation extends globally.

The Kingston hospital as well as many others in the United Kingdom have followed suit.

Milli Smith

Smith says she had seven months to prepare for Sky's passing but still felt unimaginable pain. She wonders how families who lose their baby unexpectedly cope.

"After going through this myself I feel there is a lot more that could be done to help parents cope with the loss. Support groups, counselling, even things like the planning of the funeral, additional daisy room (special room allowing you time with your baby away from the labour ward) and much much more. All these things cost money that no family should have to pay for," she says her reason behind setting up the Skye High Foundation.

Smith says she had seven months to prepare for Sky's passing but still felt unimaginable pain. She wonders how families who lose their baby unexpectedly cope.

Milli Smith

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