Krista Miranda

By Krista Miranda

LifeBuzz Staff

His Neighbors Thought He Was Crazy To Bury A Shipping Container In His Backyard.

Adding The Staircase

Adding The Staircase

Wayne Martin / YouTube

Remember how we said Wayne left four feet on the door side of the hole? Here's what that was for: Wayne added a concrete staircase that goes from the ground-level to the door of the shipping container. Wayne did most of the concrete work himself, but if you're thinking about doing this and your skills aren't up to par, you can hire someone to do the work! Because the next part depends heavily on the concrete work, it's very important that the work is done correctly

Waiting For The World To End?

Waiting For The World To End?

Wayne Martin / YouTube

The next part consists of putting up some I-beams in the hole. They must be level with the top of the container and the top of the stairs. The structure is finally coming together, but what could he be using it for? Is Wayne making a fall-out shelter? Or maybe he's making a man cave? Or maybe he's a mad scientist in need of a laboratory. We know the suspense is killing you, but you'll just have to keep on reading to find out!

Time To Add Some Support

Time To Add Some Support

Wayne Martin / YouTube

Since he had the I-beams and stairs in place, Wayne needed to put in supports to make sure that the structure was stable. This part is extremely important because without proper support the whole thing could be shifted and warped over time. This part also requires a bit of skill with the power tools. Things are starting to look really good! Check out the next slide to see it continue to take shape!

Starting To Shape Up With Rebar

Starting To Shape Up With Rebar

Wayne Martin / YouTube

Now it was time to prepare for the concrete, which you'll soon see. Wayne put up corrugated sheet metal over the top of the container, making sure they covered the entire hole. Next, Wayne took the rebar poles and welded them to the top of the entrance over the I-beams. After that, he put cinder blocks over the rebar and filled them with concrete to seal the entryway up nice and tight. The metal needed some support, so Wayne braced the metal from underneath using wood beams.

Pour Some Concrete In

Pour Some Concrete In

Wayne Martin / YouTube

Finally, it was time to make it a permanent structure. Wayne needed to pour six inches of reinforced concrete on top of the metal, so he needed to hire a team for this part. Before the concrete was poured, Wayne added in two 12-inch PVC air vents down into the container. He also added some smaller PVC pumps so he could run utilities in. No one wants to be in a hole without air or light! Have you figured out what Wayne was doing with this huge shipping container in a hole? Keep on clicking to find out the point of all of this.

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