Sheyla

By Sheyla

LifeBuzz Staff

This Is What Pregnant Mom’s Hospital Bags Look Like Around The World.

Preparation is crucial when it comes to welcoming a baby into the world. Pregnant women everywhere are expected to bring a bag to the hospital filled with essential items to receive their newborn. The basics in North America are things like a welcoming blanket, a coming home outfit, and things to make the mom-to-be comfortable and stress-free during her hospital stay.

Women around the world, however, fill their bags with things we may take for granted here such as their own toilet paper, latex gloves, and sanitary pads. Take a look at eight different countries and what their definition of essentials are.

Cathelijne Geuze from the United Kingdom filled her bag with comfortable clothes for herself, a camera, iPhone, and a water bottle to stay hydrated. She also brought a blanket her aunt knitted for her baby.

Cathelijne Geuze from the United Kingdom filled her bag with comfortable clothes for herself, a camera, iPhone, and a water bottle to stay hydrated. She also brought a blanket her aunt knitted for her baby.

Anna Kari / WaterAid

Takako Ishikawa from Japan has a lot of paperwork to do with consent and registration forms needing to be ready to hand in at the hospital. Ishikawa also brought newborn clothes, sanitary pads, and tissue paper.

Takako Ishikawa from Japan has a lot of paperwork to do with consent and registration forms needing to be ready to hand in at the hospital. Ishikawa also brought newborn clothes, sanitary pads, and tissue paper.

WaterAid

Mestawet Legesse from Ethiopia has a towel to wrap the baby in as well as sanitary napkins, underwear, and orange pop to help induce labor.

Mestawet Legesse from Ethiopia has a towel to wrap the baby in as well as sanitary napkins, underwear, and orange pop to help induce labor.

WaterAid / Behailu Shiferaw

Chadla Suyhidy Morales Benjamio from Nicaragua has sheets, one towel, and a sweater for the birth. The mom-to-be also came ready with cotton to cover her ears and a hair tie.

Chadla Suyhidy Morales Benjamio from Nicaragua has sheets, one towel, and a sweater for the birth. The mom-to-be also came ready with cotton to cover her ears and a hair tie.

Jordi Ruiz Cirera / WaterAid

Kemisa Hidaya from Uganda has a nylon sheet ready for the birth, razor blades, cotton rolls for cleaning, disinfectant, and soap to clean the room after the birth. Hidaya also has the baby clothes on hand and only brought two pairs of gloves out of the required 10 due to budget restraint.

Kemisa Hidaya from Uganda has a nylon sheet ready for the birth, razor blades, cotton rolls for cleaning, disinfectant, and soap to clean the room after the birth. Hidaya also has the baby clothes on hand and only brought two pairs of gloves out of the required 10 due to budget restraint.

James Kiyimba / WaterAid

Merina Milimo from Zambia has wraps, cotton wool, and baby clothes. She also has the peg to clip the umbilical cord and a bucket ready.

Merina Milimo from Zambia has wraps, cotton wool, and baby clothes. She also has the peg to clip the umbilical cord and a bucket ready.

Chileshe Chanda / WaterAid

Tiff Rolf from the United States has comfy slippers, pajamas, and her birth plan with her. She also has tea ready to encourage milk production and plenty of snacks.

Tiff Rolf from the United States has comfy slippers, pajamas, and her birth plan with her. She also has tea ready to encourage milk production and plenty of snacks.

Sam Morgan / WaterAid

Marie Lucette from Madagascar brought gauze, cotton baby clothes, and a sheet. Plates, spoons, cooking pot, and a chicken to cook for soup are also items the family brought.

Marie Lucette from Madagascar brought gauze, cotton baby clothes, and a sheet. Plates, spoons, cooking pot, and a chicken to cook for soup are also items the family brought.

Ernest Randriarimalala / WaterAid

Source: The Atlantic

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