Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

18 Bizarre Beauty Trends From History.

#6. The wives and daughters of Chinese noblemen underwent a foot binding process in the 13th century.

In China, when a girl was around 5 or 7 years old, the toes on her feet, minus the big toes, would be broken and laid against the sole, creating a triangular shape. The feet were then held in place with a silk strip. Over time, the wrappings became tighter. The two-year-process would result in small, dainty feet.

The wives and daughters of Chinese noblemen underwent a foot binding process in the 13th century.

Mr Randazzo / YouTube

#7. People might gawk at unibrows, but in Ancient Greece, having one told people you were very smart.

Besides intelligence, a unibrow also symbolized purity. But the women of Ancient Greece weren’t all born with a unibrow. So, they would draw one on themselves using kohl pigment to achieve the brainy look.

People might gawk at unibrows, but in Ancient Greece, having one told people you were very smart.

Weird History

#8. Although facial hair removal isn’t a big deal, European women in the Middle Ages went too far.

They believed that eyelashes were too over the top, so they had a habit of removing them completely. How they achieved this is beyond us. But hopefully, they didn’t pluck them out because that sounds painful.

Although facial hair removal isn’t a big deal, European women in the Middle Ages went too far.

#9. Renaissance women weren’t known for having a set of long teeth because it just wasn’t cool.

In those days, it was far better to have short teeth. Who knew that too much gum tissue showing above the top teeth used to be so trendy in those days? Ironically, some modern-day people might feel that a gummy smile makes them look less attractive.

Renaissance women weren’t known for having a set of long teeth because it just wasn’t cool.

Gerard van Honthorst / Public Domain

#10. Cleavage was all the rage in 17th Century England, but there was more to it than a plunging neckline.

Paleness was considered a sign of wealth because the rich didn’t have to work in the sun. So, to look pale, women used powder on their faces and cleavages. They even drew blue veins on their bosom to make it seem like their skin was translucent.

Cleavage was all the rage in 17th Century England, but there was more to it than a plunging neckline.

Peter Lely

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