Sheyla

By Sheyla

LifeBuzz Staff

Meet The Bloodwood Tree That’s A Real-Life Halloween Nightmare.

It’s an argument that goes back and forth; do plants feel? They do not have a brain or nervous system that tells them they are being hurt. Still, from the smallest to the tallest plants and trees, they all know to instinctively moving towards sunlight.

According to the Institute for Applied Physics at the University of Bonn in Germany, plants release gases when they are being cut, the equivalent of crying out in pain. The university recorded the sounds the plants release in the form of gases using a laser-powered microphone.

“The more a plant is subjected to stress, the louder the signal we get on our microphone,” explains one of the researchers, Frank Kühnemann. In fact, the summer smell of freshly cut grass is actually a chemical released to warn other plants of danger, according researchers from the University of Georgia. One tree in Africa displays its hurt and pain in a very human way.

The pterocarpus angolensis or bloodwood tree can be found in various parts of Africa like Zimbabwe, Tanzania, South Africa, and Zaire, among others.

The tree can grow as high as 15 feet with its imposing stature and canopy like branches.

The pterocarpus angolensis or bloodwood tree can be found in various parts of Africa like Zimbabwe, Tanzania, South Africa, and Zaire, among others.

When the tree is cut down, it bleeds red sap wood.

The tree releases the red sap to heal the area where it was cut.

When the tree is cut down, it bleeds red sap wood.

The timber is very popular as it gives off a beautiful reddish brown colour and is resistant to termites.

The material has been used for furniture and canoes.

The blood sap is used as a dye to be used for the face and body.

The blood-like appearance has many locals believing it has magical powers.

Bloodwood sap is used for medicinal purposes.

It is used to treat eye problems, blackwater fevers, ringworms, and increase breast milk production.

Bloodwood sap is used for medicinal purposes.

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