Leilani

By Leilani

LifeBuzz Staff

9 Ordinary Things Your Body Does Every Day That Save Your Life.

Do pruney hands and feet give us a better grip?

One study involving a test of 20 subjects revealed that wrinkly fingers allowed for better grip. Another study, however, proved that wrinkles had nothing to do with dexterity.

Still, there are many other unsightly characteristics we can find on our body that benefit us. These include sweat and earwax.

When you sweat, your pores open up and release extra buildup. Even though most of us want to get rid of earwax, having a right amount is important. Earwax helps prevent bacteria, dust, and other germs from entering your ears.

Do pruney hands and feet give us a better grip?

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Tears serve as a critical defense mechanism for our eyes.

Tears are among the several defense mechanisms that protect our eyes from infection. They flush foreign particles from the surface and transport antimicrobial agents to the area to work in our defense. They also help reduce stress hormones, which is why some experts encourage their patients to cry.

Tears serve as a critical defense mechanism for our eyes.

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Goosebumps expand our tactile senses beyond just direct contact with the skin.

Animals with a thick hair coat have a few benefits from goosebumps. This is because the contraction causes the hair to stand up and serve as insulation when the body feels cold. The hair can also make them appear bigger to potential threats.

Goosebumps, or the pilomotor reflex, are caused by adrenaline or a sudden change of temperature. Strong emotions are also a common cause in humans.

Although we don't have the same benefits from goosebumps that other animals do (unless you live in the wild and have ridiculously hairy arms), they still help us feel things that we probably wouldn't be able to detect with our skin alone, such as tiny bugs.

Goosebumps expand our tactile senses beyond just direct contact with the skin.

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Here's one defense mechanism that may not always work in your favor.

Your brain is packed with defense mechanisms, which can sometimes prevent you from positivity and productivity. When receiving feedback, especially harsh feedback, your brain might perceive the news as purely good or purely bad.

Try to steer away from thinking in black and whites. Instead of seeing an "area of improvement" conversation at work as catastrophic, try to view it as an opportunity.

Yes, we know it's easier said than done, which is why it's important to practice.

Here's one defense mechanism that may not always work in your favor.

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