Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

Here's Why You Should Wrap Your Car Keys In Aluminum Foil.

The Perfect Heist

The Perfect Heist

Albert Lopez / Facebook

Every car model has a specific fault, and the key to performing the perfect heist involves finding it. Toyotas and Chevrolets? They’re super easy to infiltrate. So is Ford. Even a novice could do it. With a few keystrokes, immobilizers that prevent engines from turning on without the ignition key are bypassed. Alarms are disabled. It’s as if the car manufacturers are losing this fight. So, some companies are offering a few unconventional recommendations.

Key Cloning

Key Cloning

Mbreterit E Rrugeve Shqiptare / Facebook

Anyone who can afford a $200,000 Bentley would never consider scrapping their cars because they’ve lost their keys. Locksmiths can easily create a replacement key for most cars. There’s also a special guide on cloning keys available on the internet. Then, these thieves will steal a locksmiths’ tool and voila! But another popular method has become easier to implement.

Copying The Signal

Copying The Signal

Driving

In Solihull, England, a family became victims of this technological method of car theft. According to their security cameras, the thieves copied the signal of a Mercedes key they found in the house. This was all done with the help of a relay box, which allowed them to open the door, and drive off. But how were they able to steal the car without breaking any windows?

A Simple Solution

A Simple Solution

The Star

“The cyber threat is so dynamic and ever-changing, it’s hard for consumers to keep up,” explained Holly Hubert, who spent years working with the FBI in Buffalo, New York. So what’s an easy and affordable solution? Try aluminum foil. “Although it’s not ideal, it is the most inexpensive way.” But how can tin foil keep cars safe? Especially since thieves are using technology to get away with everything.

It’s Quick, Silent, And Easy

It’s Quick, Silent, And Easy

DiarioPanorama

Owners of modern cars have proximity keys, which unlock car doors and start engines without having to insert anything. So, one crook walked to the back of the house while trying to get the key’s signal using a special box. They suspected the key was on the ground floor. The signal was so strong that it penetrated through the walls, doors, and windows until it reached the first box. From there, the signal bounced off to the second box held by another thief. The entire process was quick and painless. And this government agent had something to add about these types of thefts.

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