Krista Miranda

By Krista Miranda

LifeBuzz Staff

Ancient Roman Landmark Attracts Tourists For Cutest Reason.

Approximately 250 feral Italian cats have made the ruins their home!

That's an incredible amount of furry felines! Once word got around that there was a safe place for them to live, more and more cats began to show up. But it wasn't just because they liked the aesthetic of the ruins. These cats had a much better reason for staying put.

Approximately 250 feral Italian cats have made the ruins their home!

Lisa Brown

Typically, stray animals are discouraged from making their home in ancient monuments, but things were a bit different at the Largo Di Torre Argentina.

Due to the continuous efforts of the local gattare, also known as the cat ladies, these cats are taken care of and fed while they live at the ruins.

Free food and love? It's no surprise that hundreds of cats have moved in.

It's so wonderful that there's a safe place for all of these cats, but where exactly did they come from?

It's not unusual to see feral cats in every city you go to, but Rome is literally overflowing with them. You see, Italy has a no-kill law for homeless cats, which is great for the cats, but not so much for finding them all a place to live.

It's so wonderful that there's a safe place for all of these cats, but where exactly did they come from?

Lisa Brown

It wasn't long before the cats realized the ruins would make a great home for all of them.

So the cats got together and happily moved into one of the most infamously gruesome landmarks in Rome. But these cats were smarter than they seemed. After all, if they moved into the ruins more people would notice them, and hopefully, give them a helping hand.

The cats were taken care of, spayed, and neutered by the gattare of Rome for well over 60 years.

But eventually, something else needed to be done for these frisky felines. So in 1993, two women, Lia and Silvia, realized that the cat population needed to get under control, so they created the Torre Argentina Cat Sanctuary!

The cats were taken care of, spayed, and neutered by the gattare of Rome for well over 60 years.

Lisa Brown

Page 2 of 4