Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

Did You Know That Even Trees Can Be Shy?

Did you know that some trees can be every bit as antisocial as we are sometimes? It turns out that they mind growing next to each other, but when it comes to actually meeting one another at the top, it just never hopes. It's as if some genius landscaper grabbed a chainsaw and simply created an outline that separated the trees, but it's actually a natural phenomenon called crown shyness, and some tree species seem to try their best to avoid touching each other. But while the phenomenon might seem natural to them, it's simply beautiful to look at from a lowly human perspective.

Not every tree in a forest canopy wants to touch each other's branches.

A phenomenon called crown shyness proves that, but you might have missed it. So next time you're in the wilderness, look up. You might notice some trees never touch.

Not every tree in a forest canopy wants to touch each other's branches.

The visual effect is simply spectacular and is a bit like broken ice glaciers.

In the process of avoiding each other, the trees have created a designed border, which are even more obvious when you look at the trees from above.

Scientists have been aware of crown shyness since the 1920s.

But to this day, they haven't exactly figured out what causes it to happen. However, some members of the scientific community think it might be caused by two trees rubbing up against each other.

Scientists have been aware of crown shyness since the 1920s.

The effect might also be Mother Nature's way of ensuring the survival of these trees.

After all, if the branches intertwine, the chances of getting sunlight to come through will be limited. But this way, there won't be any shading so that the trees can better sun exposure.

The effect might also be Mother Nature's way of ensuring the survival of these trees.

There's another theory that this phenomenon acts as a form of pest control.

In order to prevent the spread of harmful insects that could damage both animal and vegetation, scientists believe that this spacing between the trees allows the sun to act as a form of pest control.

There's another theory that this phenomenon acts as a form of pest control.

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