Amanda

By Amanda

LifeBuzz Staff

Daylight Savings Time Has An Interesting History Most People Don’t Know About.

Waking up yesterday morning was basically the greatest thing ever: Even if you had to be up for an 8:00 am breakfast or a 9:00 exercise class, you got to roll over and sleep for an extra hour, blissfully enjoying the spoils of the twice-yearly daylight savings time.

And while everyone can enjoy it, not many know the history of this seemingly arbitrary time change. Below, we've compiled a bunch of interesting facts about fall's extra hour of sleep --and spring's extra hour of daylight. Check them out below and see what all the fuss is about -- #8 is actually kind of scary.

#1. Daylight savings is only observed in 48 states, with Hawaii and Arizona neglecting to participate. It's also only observed in 78 countries around the world.

#2. Pictured is William Willet, the British builder who first proposed the idea of daylight savings time but never saw it come to fruition. Thus, this April will mark the 100th anniversary of daylight savings, which formally started in Germany in 1916.

Pictured is William Willet, the British builder who first proposed the idea of daylight savings time but never saw it come to fruition. Thus, this April will mark the 100th anniversary of daylight savings, which formally started in Germany in 1916.

#3. Bars don't have to stay open one hour longer. For example, in California, bars are required to close at 1:59 am. Daylight savings kicks off at 2pm.

#4. Until 1966, states and other governments could arbitrarily start and end day light saving time whenever they felt like it. At one point, it was possible to travel through seven time changes in one ride between Ohio to West Virginia.

#5. A 2014 study reported that 27% of Americans said that the time change made them early or late -- and that's with the help of automatically time-changing smart devices.

A 2014 study reported that 27% of Americans said that the time change made them early or late -- and that's with the help of automatically time-changing smart devices.

#6. Twins are sticky predicament during daylight savings time. During the time change in the fall, one baby could be born at 1:55 a.m. and the sibling born ten minutes later, at 1:05 a.m. When we switch the clocks ahead in the spring, there is a gap when no babies born are recorded on paper at all: from 2:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m.

Twins are sticky predicament during daylight savings time. During the time change in the fall, one baby could be born at 1:55 a.m. and the sibling born ten minutes later, at 1:05 a.m. When we switch the clocks ahead in the spring, there is a gap when no babies born are recorded on paper at all: from 2:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m.

#7. It’s well documented that Benjamin Franklin was one of the first to propose daylight saving time in the United States, but he actually wrote about it in what was supposed to be a satirical essay.

It’s well documented that Benjamin Franklin was one of the first to propose daylight saving time in the United States, but he actually wrote about it in what was supposed to be a satirical essay.

#8. Losing one hour of sleep by switching to daylight saving time has been linked to increased risk of heart attacks. In fact, one Michigan hospital reported that admissions increased by 25% on the Monday following the spring time change.

Losing one hour of sleep by switching to daylight saving time has been linked to increased risk of heart attacks. In fact, one Michigan hospital reported that admissions increased by 25% on the Monday following the spring time change.

#9. Crime might go down during daylight savings: One study by the U.S. Law Enforcement Assistance Administration found that during this time, violent crime lessened by 10-13%, most likely because there are less hours of darkness.

#10. So, why does daylight saving time happen at 2 a.m.? According to Live Science, it’s considered to be the least disruptive time of day — and it allows for turning back the clocks without changing the date to “yesterday.”

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