Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

Deer Rescued After Spotted With Something Stuck On Its Head.

That Poor Deer

That Poor Deer

Pete Thomas Outdoors

Herds of white-tailed deer are not uncommon in New Jersey. In fact, they're often seen grazing on roadsides and backyards. Thankfully, the white-tailed deer population is not in danger of natural predators in this area. Then again, they do encounter other predators like domestic dogs, motorists, and humans. But one deer in the area almost lost its life to something that was totally random. Then a natural predator came by and saved the day and its life.

Bowling Anyone?

Bowling Anyone?

Monmouth County / Facebook

In the Colts Neck area, a homeowner noticed a deer with a furry, brown body, and long, skinny legs walking around his backyard. But there was something off about this creature. It looked like he had some kind of bowl on its head, almost like a space helmet. So, the owner walked over to get a closer look, and was shocked. It didn't take long for him to see that the young deer's life was in great jeopardy.

Deer In Distress

Deer In Distress

Monmouth County / Facebook

Somehow, the deer had stuck his head in a glass bowl, and it had obviously been shunned by its herd because it wasn't traveling with any other deer. At a press release, the Monmouth County SPCA (MCSPCA) said: “Certain species will treat members as outcasts if they look different or are injured so to not invite predators or disrupt the integrity of the herd.” This was bad news for the deer.

What's Next?

What's Next?

Monmouth County / Facebook

With the bowl on its head, the deer wasn't just having issues breathing. It couldn't drink or eat either. Under the circumstances, it was safe to assume that the deer wouldn't survive for very long if it couldn't do these three things effectively. Now the homeowner realized he needed to help the deer, but he also needed help to accomplish this, so he called the MCSPCA, as well as the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife.

Time To Sedate

Time To Sedate

Monmouth County / Facebook

The first thing they had to do was to sedate the buck. Then the rescue team could start helping. The MCSPCA went on Facebook and wrote: “The glass bowl was removed, which turned out to be a light fixture cover, which probably had been filled with water the deer tried to drink. The buck was dehydrated from four days without food and water and had a couple of scrapes probably from the poor visibility but was able to get up and walk away after we cleaned him up and the sedative had worn off.”

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