Krista Miranda

By Krista Miranda

LifeBuzz Staff

Stray Dog Climbs 7,000-Meter Himalayan Peak.

Humans tend to put themselves into intense situations for the sake of testing their boundaries. Some people enjoy skydiving or cliff jumping, and others enjoy snowboarding or ice climbing. Whatever the hobby is, humans really enjoy seeing how far they can push themselves. But strangely enough, humans aren't the only ones who like to see how far they can go!

23,389 Feet

If you’ve ever hiked up a mountain, you understand how tiring and difficult it can be, not to mention, extremely dangerous. Climbing a small mountain is one thing, but what about a mountain that has a peak that’s 23,389 feet in the air? Climbing a Himalayan peak is a large feat for a human, but what if a dog tried to do it?

23,389 Feet

Don Wargowsky / Facebook

Stray Dog

On the tenth day of a month-long expedition to the peak of Baruntse, a Katmandu-based Summit Climb led by Don Wargowsky, was joined by an unsuspecting climbing enthusiast. While they were making their way up to the summit, the group was joined by a stray dog, named Mera. She immediately took a liking to Wargowsky. Once Mera proved that she was able to keep up, she became Wargowsky’s tent partner for the remainder of their trip.

Stray Dog

Don Wargowsky / Facebook

Sharing A Tent

Wargowsky and his new buddy were quite content sharing a tent with one another. “One morning we got wind so bad it ripped the anchors off the tent, picked it up, and moved it a few feet. She just woke up, looked at me, and went back to sleep," recalled Wargowsky. Wow, it seems like Mera was more than capable of handling such harsh conditions!

Sharing A Tent

Don Wargowsky / Facebook

Confident Dog

Despite the fact that the group was keeping a decent pace, their new traveling companion seemed annoyed that they were going too slow. "I have no clue if she'd been up there before, but she seemed very confident in what she was doing," said Wargowsky. Could it be that Mera thought that she was the leader of the pack? Had she been on this incredible journey before?

Confident Dog

Don Wargowsky / Facebook

A Little Help

Other than briefly needing human assistance to zip-line for a short distance, she did the entire climb on her own. "I am not aware of a dog actually summiting an expedition peak in Nepal. I just hope that she won't get into trouble for having climbed Baruntse without a permit," said Billi Bierling of the Himalayan Database.

A Little Help

Don Wargowsky / Facebook

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