Leilani

By Leilani

LifeBuzz Staff

25 Facts About US Elections That Will Tickle Your Brain.

The United States is the world's largest economy if you're looking at nominal GDP. We're also a major leader in technology and innovation. Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon. The first cell phone was made by Motorola, an American company. Michigan-born Henry Ford was credited for developing the first affordable automobile. America is also home to some of the world's most significant civil rights leaders, Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks. And don't get us started on pop culture.

These are just a few of the reasons that the rest of the world looks to us for an example. This is why our presidential election, held every four years on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, is viewed as an international event.

We've made history by voting this past decade. Barack Obama was the first African American to serve as POTUS, Hillary Clinton was the first woman to be nominated by a major party, and Donald J. Trump, 70, will be the oldest candidate to be sworn into office. But history was also made in years past. Check out our list of 25 election facts below to see how.

Let us know what you think. Have we made progress or is history merely repeating itself? What do you hope to see in the future?

#1. Winning the popular vote but not the election didn't just happen to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. It happened to four other candidates, including Al Gore in 2000.

Winning the popular vote but not the election didn't just happen to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. It happened to four other candidates, including Al Gore in 2000.

#2. To honor Election Day in 1996, the New York Times released this crossword. Clinton is filled in here but writing in his opponent Bob Dole would have worked out as well.

To honor Election Day in 1996, the New York Times released this crossword. Clinton is filled in here but writing in his opponent Bob Dole would have worked out as well.

The New York Times

#3. On Inauguration Day, the President can take their oath on any Bible or books of their choosing. In 2013, President Obama used two Bibles, Martin Luther King Jr.'s and Abraham Lincoln's. He also used the latter for his 2009 inauguration.

On Inauguration Day, the President can take their oath on any Bible or books of their choosing. In 2013, President Obama used two Bibles, Martin Luther King Jr.'s and Abraham Lincoln's. He also used the latter for his 2009 inauguration.

Chuck Kennedy-Pool/Getty Images

#4. Horace Greeley, founder of the New-York Tribune and the new Liberal Republican Party's candidate in the 1872, passed away after the election but before the Electoral College balloted. Ulysses S. Grant came out as the victor that year by a wide margin.

Horace Greeley, founder of the New-York Tribune and the new Liberal Republican Party's candidate in the 1872, passed away after the election but before the Electoral College balloted. Ulysses S. Grant came out as the victor that year by a wide margin.

J.E. Baker

#5. Even though Congress granted citizenship to Native Americans born in the U.S. on June 2, 1924, some states barred them from voting until 1957.

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