Sheyla

By Sheyla

LifeBuzz Staff

The Real Origin Of 10 Expressions You Use Everyday.

Language is constantly evolving. According to the Linguistic Society of America, English like other languages change because the world around is constantly adapting to new technologies, personal experiences, and influence of other languages.

Contrary to popular belief, ancient or older English is not necessarily better or more proper, it is just different from what we know. In the 80s, things were gnarly, in the 90s, they were phat, and just over a decade ago, if you didn’t know something or were inexperienced, you’d be called a newbie. A lot of today's slang words that seemed to all of a suddenly appear, have a much more complex, rich, and old history behind them.

Twerking

Today twerking refers to a form of dance move, often seen as obscene. But this funny sounding word dates back to 1820 where it meant to twitch or move in a jerking manner. By 1848, it became a verb. That means Queen Victoria could have been the first twerking monarch while Napoleon could have twerked his way to the French presidency.

Twerking

Getty

Pussy

Pussy has many meanings but it may have gotten extra attention when it was revealed it was part of Donald's Trump rhetoric. Today, pussy refers to female genitalia in a demeaning way, an insult used to describe a man as a coward, and of course cats. In the 1500's the word was used to describe women with cat-like qualities, in a non-sexual connote.

Pussy

NYDailyNews

Unfriend

When you think of this word, removing a person from Facebook automatically comes to mind. The word itself is over 100 years old. The meaning has remained the same which is to no longer be a friend with someone.

Unfriend

Getty

Dude

Dude has been associated with the 80s surfers, ranchers, and generally when talking about cool guys. The word was inspired by Yankee Doodle Dandy; dude was initially spelled with two Os and it used to refer to a guy who focused on his appearance and clothing, excessively. Surprisingly enough, there was a female version, the dudine. Today, it’s more like an expression for brotherhood like, "Dude! You’re my dude."

Dude

The Dude / Twitter

Xmas

Language puritans hate when the word Christmas is replaced by the shortened "Xmas." The smaller version is over 1,000 years old, when it was used to save space on religious manuscripts printed on expensive parchment paper.

Xmas

Ebay / Wikipedia

Page 1 of 2

Like Us On Facebook!Close this