Amanda

By Amanda

LifeBuzz Staff

You’ve Probably Never Heard Of These Famous Photographers… But You’ve Seen Their Work.

Thomas Mangelsen

Brown bear, Brooks Falls Katmai National Park, Alaska. July 1988. I pre visualized this possibility (of an image like this) from watching documentary films about the bears at Katmai and seeing a photograph in Alaska Air Magazine of a group of bears here at the falls. At the time, I was on a flight to Anchorage working on a documentary film about Sandhill Cranes and had a week between shoots. I phoned the park headquarters from the airport in Achorage and asked about getting a campsite. They said they were all full – ecept for one site, that was near the bear trail and nobody wanted it. I told them I would take it. I spent a week on a small platform above the falls trying to captures this image. I would go most days before sunrise and stay until dark. During that time I shot 35 rolls of film of pretty much just head + shoulders of bears + sockeye salmon leaping the falls. Six weeks later I opened the yellow box to see this image. It was a nice surprise. I hadn’t known that I got it.

Nick Ut

June 8, 1972 Trang Bang Village Kim Phuc 9 year-old girl South Vietnam drop napalm in her village.

Vincent Laforet

I’ve been fortunate enough to witness some pretty amazing things in my relatively young career that began twenty years ago. Many were beautiful, others were horrifying; most were important moments in history every event big or small is important. One of the interesting things that I’ve learned through aerial photography is that taking a sep backwards (or in this case 1,500 feet up) ironically often forces the view to become much more intimae with the image as they study it in much greater detail, and are forced to let their imagination take over. “Me and my human” Central Park, NYC

Jeff Widener – Beijing 1989

Carl Fischer

Muhammad Ali, New York, 1967

David Doubilet

Circle of Barracuda, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. The school of chevron barracudas circled the diver three times and pow they were gone into a dark afternoon sea. The oceans of the world have no straight lines; geometry like a perfect circle is a rare thing, but these barracudas will do this as a defense. 70% of our planet is an ocean. It is a place of infinite hidden beauty. It is a place where light behaves in a very different manner. Global warming/ climate change is about water. Coral reefs where I have spent most of my life are very threatened now—not just from rising temperatures but from the change in ocean chemistry = This is a world where my partner Jennifer Hayes and I go into. It is most of our planet. A world without corners that may be gone by the end of the century.

Harry Benson

Brian Epstein – Beatles Manager – had just told them they were number one in America – and I was coming with them to New York. 1964

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