Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

High School Teacher Created "Gen Z Dictionary" Of All The Slang Teens Use.

It doesn’t seem fair that students are always coming up with new slang that leaves parents and teachers dumbfounded. But it’s been this way for decades. Every generation seems to come up with continuously evolving slang that is hip, so the grownups won’t know what they’re talking about. But James Callahan, a teacher at Lowell High School, has decided to outsmart his students by creating all those salty and savage terms kids use these days into a Gen Z dictionary of sorts.

All those cryptic words teens have been using will no longer plague parents and teachers at Lowell High.

James Callahan of Lowell High School in Massachusetts has heard teens using unique terms that make no sense to grownups. "I often overhear students in the hallways or my classrooms using words (or) slang terms in their personal conversations," Callahan told USA Today.

All those cryptic words teens have been using will no longer plague parents and teachers at Lowell High.

USA Today

Most teachers spend time trying to decipher what today’s teens are actually trying to say.

Callahan figured that in order to connect with his students on a more personal level, he would simply ask them what certain slang terms meant in order to understand teenagers at the high school a little better. But there was no way of keeping track.

Most teachers spend time trying to decipher what today’s teens are actually trying to say.

Unfortunately, the cat was out of the bag when one of his students spilled the beans on social media.

Twitter user @Mewtailv2 uploaded a photo of Callahan’s four-page spreadsheet. It turns out that the sociology teacher had titled the document “Callahan’s Generation Z Dictionary” and it was very insightful.

The high school teacher colored the column on the left green and typed in the common slang terms.

The column on the right was colored yellow and defined what the terms meant. For example, “High key” means “very obvious.” “Rashing” means “to make fun of someone.” The list was undoubtedly quite thorough.

Within a span of 24 hours, @Mewtailv2’s tweet received over 300,000 likes and 93,000 retweets.

Although Callahan isn’t a college professor, @Mewtailv2 told USA Today that they called him a professor in their tweet because "the word teacher didn't seem dignified enough to describe him." Plus, students earned college credit for taking his introduction to sociology course.

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