Sheyla

By Sheyla

LifeBuzz Staff

If You See A Green Light On Someone’s Porch, You Need To Know What It Means.

We often talk about how important veterans are. We all want to help and make them feel welcomed, appreciated, and respected. It is difficult to imagine that these brave men and women leave their families behind so they can serve and protect the families of complete strangers.

Their love for their country gives them the strength and courage to sacrifice their lives. As civilians it can feel trivial to thank a veteran. There are no words big enough to explain the admiration and high regards we feel for the hard work they do.

Nonetheless, their pain and struggle when they return to a regular life is real. Veterans often speak of feeling disconnected to daily life after spending months trying to stay alive and seeing things no human being should ever have to experience.

Based on the 2014 United States Census Bureau there are 19.3 million veterans in the United States.

Many of the men and women who serve do not understand the impact and trauma of war. Returning home can make them feel isolated and overwhelmed.

Based on the 2014 United States Census Bureau there are 19.3 million veterans in the United States.

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Veterans feel the only people who understand their pain are other veterans going through the same thing.

Transitioning to civilian life such as; writing up a resume, looking for a job, and even adjusting to daily life with a spouse and kids not seen or been around for months is extremely difficult.

Veterans feel the only people who understand their pain are other veterans going through the same thing.

Upon returning home veterans risk going homeless and struggle with addiction. Many silently suffer from PTSD.

The Chief Operating officer for the Institute for Veterans and Military Families, Maureen Casey, says that less than 1% of the American population has served since 9/11.

Upon returning home veterans risk going homeless and struggle with addiction. Many silently suffer from PTSD.

Peter R. Barbar

Lourdes Gonzalez signed up for the army when she was only 17 years old.

She was sent to serve in Mosul, Iraq in 2004. Living through war and not knowing if she would be alive tomorrow, made Gonzalez "learn to value life."

Lourdes Gonzalez signed up for the army when she was only 17 years old.

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Although Gonzalez has been back over eight years, she still feels like she just came home.

Yet her experience has made her stronger. "I went to Iraq, and I made it back home. So I can do anything," says Gonzalez.

Although Gonzalez has been back over eight years, she still feels like she just came home.

Walmart / YouTube

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