Sheyla

By Sheyla

LifeBuzz Staff

For The First Time EVER A Paralyzed Man Was Able To Move His Hand Again.

Giving back the ability to move for people living with paralysis seemed something out of science fiction. A group of scientists from Ohio State and Battelle Memorial Institute are making this a reality. The team has created a system that decodes brain waves to manipulate and stimulate a paralyzed limb to move.

Their first and only person to participate in this study is Ian Burkhart. The 24-year-old was vacationing with his friends five years ago when he went swimming in the ocean. Burkhart swam into a wave and hit his head into a hidden sandbar; instantly breaking his neck. For the study, Burkhart had a micro chip implanted in his brain, this sends signals to armbands with electrodes stimulating the muscles. The business management student concentrates and visualizes what he wants his hand to do.

Burkhart wanted to be part of research that will give mobility back to those living with paralysis. "I kind of felt like it was my social obligation to be a part of it," says the Ohio State University student.

Burkhart wanted to be part of research that will give mobility back to those living with paralysis. "I kind of felt like it was my social obligation to be a part of it," says the Ohio State University student.

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Battelle

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Battelle

It has taken a decade of research to make this technology advancement a reality. Experts in neurology, physiology, and engineering have collaborated together.

It has taken a decade of research to make this technology advancement a reality. Experts in neurology, physiology, and engineering have collaborated together.

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Battelle

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Battelle

The team had to first figure out which part of the brain controls hand movement. MRI's revealed brain activity when Burkhart envisioned himself using his hand.

The team had to first figure out which part of the brain controls hand movement. MRI's revealed brain activity when Burkhart envisioned himself using his hand.

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Battelle

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Battelle

Burkhart can now pick up objects and move them around. Scientists hope to expand the project and add more participants in the future.

Burkhart can now pick up objects and move them around. Scientists hope to expand the project and add more participants in the future.

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Battelle

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center/ Battelle

Source: Mashable

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