Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

Eye-Opening Photos That Show The Real Impact Of Humans On Earth.

Center for Deep Ecology

It’s obvious by now that humans are making an impressive impact on the planet. Unfortunately, it’s not a positive one. You might not be worried about what’s happening, but the effects are being felt right now, and it’ll only get worse as time goes by. The repercussions will affect generations to come too. Just look at this photo, which shows the level of pollution in Mexico City. When you add that with the ever-growing population, you get how this area has become inhospitable for animals in the region.

Center for Deep Ecology

This photo was taken in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, one of the world’s poorest nations. Notice the way the homes are stacked up. You can hardly see the ground. Sadly, the city doesn’t have enough money to implement proper waste disposal and conservation efforts. So unfortunately, Haiti won’t be getting a makeover anytime soon.

Center for Deep Ecology

The dense and poverty-stricken city of New Delhi, India is having a detrimental effect on the world’s environment. We know it’s hard to believe. However, can you really deny it after taking a look at this aerial shot of the city? There are more buildings than actual land. As a result, modern development has made the soil infertile. In fact, there’s virtually no greenery anywhere and that’s thanks to the 25 million people who live here.

Center for Deep Ecology

Do you think environmental damage doesn’t affect the US? Guess again. Los Angeles is known for its traffic problems and smog. But it also consumes tons of natural resources to power the city. This is what LA looks like at night, supposedly when people aren’t using as much electricity. The cityscape might look like something from a sci-fi film, but at a high cost.

Center for Deep Ecology

This image reveals what corporate dumping looks like. It was taken near an incineration plant in Bangladesh. Obviously, some regions could care less about harming the environment. But in some places, it’s a necessary evil to produce resources and funding, especially in poverty-stricken countries. Regardless, survival will be difficult if these places don’t address these issues soon.

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