Leilani

By Leilani

LifeBuzz Staff

The Hand-Carved Suites At ICEHOTEL Are Worth Braving The Cold For.

Many of our ephemeral experiences, or those lasting for a short time, are the ones that stick with us the longest. Perhaps this feeling is what inspired the founders of ICEHOTEL, Jukkasjärvi, Sweden, when they first started in 1989.

ICEHOTEL is just how it sounds -- the walls, floors, and ceilings of the hotel are made of natural ice and snow which artists from across the globe use as a canvas for new designs each year. The ice and snow come from one of Europe's few surviving wild rivers, the Torne, 200 kilometers north of the Arctic Circle. The artists, both new and returning, are carefully selected from hundreds of impressive applicants. Building occurs over a span of two months. Come spring, this part accommodation, part art establishment melts to the ground.

“In November, Jukkasjärvi becomes a melting pot of influences, cultures and languages. Everyone comes together to create art – it is a fantastic journey to be a part of," says the hotel's Director of Design, Jens Thomas Ivarsson, on the official site.

Below you will find photos of the two most recent hotels to give you an idea of just how much variety and creativity is invested in this magical place. It's no wonder over 35,000 guests come to stay here every year.

ICEHOTEL 25 (Winter 2014-15): Boom

The ICEHOTEL in Jukkasjärvi has been rebuilt each year since 1989. Pictured here is the ICEBAR 'Boom' by Wouter Biegelaar, Viktor Tsarski & Maurizio Perron, within a dome-shaped structure next to the hotel with lounge sofas and a large dance floor.

ICEHOTEL 25 (Winter 2014-15): Boom

Paulina Holmgren

Hot Type

This 'Hot Type' suite by John Bark & Charli Kasselbäck features hand-carved letterpress types on one wall and an imprint on the either. The artists used typefaces that have made an impression on their lives -- Baskerville, Bodoni, Akzidenz, and Futura.

Hot Type

Paulina Holmgren

7.5 ° Rø

In '7.5 ° Rø,' Wolfgang-A. Lüchow, Sebastian Andreas Scheller, and Anja Kilian divided the suite into 12 frames, giving the illusion of infinity. Their inspiration, astronomer Ole Christensen Rømer, invented a thermometer with Rø units. Water turns to ice at 7.5° Rø.

7.5 ° Rø

Paulina Holmgren

Spring

The pillars of 'Spring' by Wilfred Stijger & Edith Van De Wetering are designed like tree trunks and as the ice melts, their silhouettes can be seen more clearly.

Spring

Paulina Holmgren

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