Krista Miranda

By Krista Miranda

LifeBuzz Staff

22 Interracial Relationships That Changed History.

We're lucky to live in a time when it's not such a big deal to see people of different races in a relationship with one another. Well, in most places that's true. It's unfortunate, but there are still some undeniably prejudiced people and places in the United States at this time. Because of that, it's a nice reminder to understand that love comes in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes. Love itself isn't prejudiced and these couples knew and understood that sentiment. Take a few moments to appreciate these interracial power couples who helped pave the way for interracial couples today, who have the right to safely love each other openly and without discrimination!

Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou is considered one of the world's most distinguished poets and authors. Most people don't realize that Maya's name was a combination of the nickname she had when she was a child and her Greek husband's last name. The couple met in a record shop in San Francisco and they were married in 1953. The marriage didn't last long because Angelos, her husband, was atheist and Maya was very spiritual.

Maya Angelou

Clinton Presidential Library / Public Domain

Pearl Bailey and Louie Bellson

In modern times, Pearl Bailey was one of the original divas of music. Established drummer Louie Bellson was the only white member of Duke Ellington's infamous band. The couple was married after only knowing each other for five days. Even though the couple received an unbelievable amount of backlash and criticism, the couple stayed married for 38 years and adopted two children together.

Pearl Bailey and Louie Bellson

Lena Horne and Lenny Hayton

Lena Horne was always meant to be a star. When she was just 16, her mother entered her into the Chorus Line at the well-known Cotton Club. Unfortunately, while traveling on tour through Hollywood, Lena experienced extensive discrimination. She was considered too "brown" to be white and too "light" to be black. Hayton was an arranger, conductor, and composer, but he was also white. The couple had to be secretive about their relationship, so they hid their marriage for almost three years. Shortly after Lena's father and son passed away in 1973, Lena lost Hayton, as well. Lena was quoted in a New York Times article that she gave credit to Hayton for teaching her to accept love.

Lena Horne and Lenny Hayton

Clarence Thomas and Virginia Lamp

Clarence Thomas married lobbyist, and aide to the Republican Congressman Dick Armey, Virginia Lamp. Thomas became the nation's second African-American Supreme court Justice, breaking racial barriers as a result. Thomas had a son from a previous marriage and he began to raise his 6-year-old nephew in 1997. Oddly enough, his firm conservative views have kind of made him an outcast in the black community.

Clarence Thomas and Virginia Lamp

Frederick Douglass and Helen Pitts

Frederick Douglas spent 38 years of his life as a slave. He married Anna Murray once he was finally able to escape enslavement. He was an inspiring author and an advocate for American unity and social change. The couple brought five children into the world before Anna died. Douglas would later marry white abolitionist, Helen Pitts. In 1895, Douglas gave an inspirational speech about women's suffrage but passed away soon after.

Frederick Douglass and Helen Pitts

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