Sheyla

By Sheyla

LifeBuzz Staff

16 Years Of Human Life On The International Space Station Told In GIFs

It is hard to look at the International Space Station (ISS) and not imagine a future where living in space or at a planet is within our reach. Since astronauts made ISS their residence on November 2, 2000, it has orbited the earth over 100,000 times.

The goal may have been initially to carry out laboratory experiments impossible to do on earth but the purpose has grown exponentially. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) hopes the station will be the base for future missions to Mars and the moon.

Some of the advances made in space are trickling down to earth benefiting people in need. Using resources to convert waste water into drinking water is something NASA is collaboratively working with world aid organizations. As well as studying monitoring natural disaster areas, preventing bone loss, and fighting osteoporosis are just some of the ways the space station benefits earth. Take a closer look at the space station in the last 16 years.

The Space Station was built in orbit.

The first module was launched in 1998. The station works as a space laboratory where crew members conduct experiments in fields such as biology, physics, meteorology, and astronomy. Five space agencies with crews from 15 countries assembled the station.

The Space Station was built in orbit.

NASA

November 2, 2016 marked the 16 years of human presence in space.

Expedition 1 arrived on the International Space Station on November 2, 2000. Commander William Shepherd and his crew members, Sergei Krikalev, and Yuri Gidzenko, hold hands for the camera.

November 2, 2016 marked the 16 years of human presence in space.

NASA

What the International Space Station saw on September 11, 2001.

American Commander Frank Culberton and his Russian crew mates saw the images of earth on that fateful day while they were on the Expedition 3. Culbertson is the only American who was not on the planet that day. The station is often used during disasters to aid and provide information to emergency agencies.

What the International Space Station saw on September 11, 2001.

NASA

It took an arm to build the station in space.

Kibo is the name of the arm used to put together the different modules in space. It was launched on June 3, 2008. Kibo means hope in Japanese and it's the largest module on the space station.

It took an arm to build the station in space.

NASA

The first 6 person crew took place on May 29, 2009.

One astronaut represented an agency from NASA, CSA, ESA, JAXA, and Russia. It was the only time all six agencies were in the station at the same time.

The first 6 person crew took place on May 29, 2009.

NASA

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