Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

The Lost City Of Etzanoa Unearthed In Kansas.

Paving The Way

Paving The Way

ArchaeologyInBulgaria

Once Blakeslee made it to high school, he was finally surrounded by peers who were on the same intellectual level as him. His fellow students were also focused on their college careers just like he was. So, his history teacher decided to mentor him. Soon, Blakeslee was invited to conferences, and shared books with his teacher. But Blakeslee never imagined his interest would shape his future career.

History Buff

History Buff

DailyMail

Blakeslee’s peers were skeptical when he told them he wanted to be an archaeologist, but his teachers and family knew that the past interested him. Plus, he always scoured the library until he found the answers to his questions. He had been a history buff ever since he was old enough to pick up a book. But he never imagined he would make a discovery of his own.

Big Plans

Big Plans

TheSunflower

Blakeslee received a PH. D from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. It was during his studies that he became interested in early American settlements, sacred sites, and native trails. He eventually took over as president of the Professional Archaeologists of Kansas to focus on the protohistory period, a time before civilization had developed any type of written language. Blakeslee had some pretty big plans and challenges ahead of him.

Over Five Decades Of Searching

Over Five Decades Of Searching

AllThatsInteresting

Blakeslee always wondered if there were other settlements like the Cahokia in Illinois. But it wasn’t until he was 75 years old that he found a potential way to fill a gap in American history. Fortunately, he had the help of researchers he had befriended during his career, which spanned more than five decades. Blakeslee believed he had found what he had been looking for since he was young. And it was full of treasures.

Lost City Of Etzanoa

Lost City Of Etzanoa

ArchaeologicalConservancy

Using various technologies and translated texts, Blakeslee was able to locate what he believed to be the lost city of Etzanoa. In 1601, Spanish conquistadors documented their discovery after stumbling onto the city by accident. They wrote that the locals “napped beneath trees festooned with tinkling gold bells.” But years of research forced Blakeslee to return to Kansas. And yet the question remained, why was Etzanoa considered a “lost city?”

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