In British Forests There Are Mysterious Trees Covered With Money.

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We've heard it all before: Money doesn't talk, make you happy, buy you love, or grow on trees.

Except, in this case, it does - or at least appears to. Read more below - and check out the insane pictures to prove it.


In fact, somewhere in Scotland, there is a tree with hundreds of double florins - incredibly old and rare British coins - pushed into it.

Historically, the act of pushing coins into trees dates all the way back to the 1700's.

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The coin-covered trees can be spotted all over the UK, ranging from the forests of the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands.

Shaun Whiteman

For years, the coins have been pushed into the trees by passersby, many of whom believe the legend that doing so will bring them good luck.

Ministry

There are other legends surrounding the coins as well. For example, some believed that wizened tree stumps were homes for deities and supernatural creatures.

Drew

In fact, many people would bring coins and other gifts to the trees on Christmas or other special occasions, hoping to offer some goodwill to the divine entities that lived there.

Ken Wewerka

Additionally, many Scots and Brits in earlier centuries put the coins into trees in order to muster up some goodwill for themselves - it was believed that adding coins to a tree trunk could help your illness disappear.

Janet Ramsden

Today, the coins are an amazing sight to behold, and the different currencies, many of them from different centuries, serve as a fascinating window into the past.

Paul Morriss

For UK residents, the tradition is similar to the American practice of hooking padlocks to a fence for love - it makes people feel like they are putting something positive and long-lasting into the world.

Paul Britton

Looking at these beautiful images (and knowing the history behind them), it's hard to disagree.

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