Amanda

By Amanda

LifeBuzz Staff

Forbidden City’s Secret Garden Was Just Opened For The First Time In A 100 Years.

Beginning in the Ming dynasty, the Forbidden City was an elaborate and intimidating palace that housed China's ancient emperors. It's thought to be the pinnacle of Chinese art and architecture from that time period, and today it's one of the most frequented by tourists. While the tours of the grounds are elaborate, there's one area that no one has seen since 1924 -- until now, that is.

The Qianlong Garden has been sealed since the last emperor was removed in 1924. Now, after a massive restoration by the Palace Museum and the World Monuments Fund, the secret garden is set to open once again. See some of the incredible images of this forgotten space below.

Here's an aerial shot of the Forbidden City. The Qianlong Garden has been off limits to the public for years.

Here's an aerial shot of the Forbidden City. The Qianlong Garden has been off limits to the public for years.

Allison Meier

The garden will open to the public for the first time in almost a century.

The garden was built by the fourth emperor of the Qing Dynasty, intended to be part of his retirement housing.

He was one of the richest people of the era, and established an edict that nothing about the garden be changed after his death.

He was one of the richest people of the era, and established an edict that nothing about the garden be changed after his death.

Henry Ng

As such, it's remained unchanged until now.

Currently, the Palace Museum and World Monument Fund have collaborated to restore the garden and open it to the public.

Bamboo marquetry, silk paintings, jade carvings and 18th-century glass art are all fascinating parts of the Qianlong Garden.

There are also dozens of rare, undamaged finishings and interiors in the space.

Restoration began in 2008, tackling the project room by room. Each space in the garden has a unique design, which made restoration a complicated and careful process.

“Many of the threads were lost for how this place was built,” WMF Senior Advisor Henry Ng has said, “Now life is slowly returning, but instead of being a private oasis, the Qianlong Garden will be a public resource for experiencing the lost crafts of 18th-century China.”

The Qianlong Garden is expected to open to the public in 2020.

Source: My Modern Met

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