Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

Scottish Farmer Attracts American Tourists With Tartan Sheep.

The people of Scotland have a wicked sense of humor, and anyone who’s ever visited 62-year-old Scottish farmer Maxine Scott is aware of this. As a matter of fact, Maxine knows all too well that American tourists can be somewhat gullible at times. In fact, she’s proven that time and time again over the last 10 years by convincing them that her two sheep, Daisy, and April had tartan patterned wool, and she gets a kick out of this every single time.

Over the last 10 years, 62-year-old Maxine Scott has pulled the wool over the eyes of American tourists.

She has claimed that her two sheep, Daisy and April drink Irn-Bru, a Scottish carbonated soft drink, and that their coats turn a shade of tartan. The sheep have attracted lots of tourists to the Auchingarrich Wildlife Centre in Comrie, Perthshire. But there’s more to them than meets the eye.

Over the last 10 years, 62-year-old Maxine Scott has pulled the wool over the eyes of American tourists.

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People from around the world come to the centre, so Maxine has found a way to trick tourists.

She put up a sign that claims the sheep turn that beautiful tartan colour all on their own, which is hilarious on so many levels. "As a lamb they will look similar to a regular sheep, as their colours won't fully show until they are about a year old," Maxine explained.

People from around the world come to the centre, so Maxine has found a way to trick tourists.

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"Then as they get older their colours can change, so if you visit us again you may see a new tartan," she continued.

The sign also explains that the wool is very special because it is used to make kilts. To really sell the lie, she goes on to talk about the sheep’s diet, which consists mainly of grass, Scottish Tablet, shortbread, and of course, Irn Bru.

"Then as they get older their colours can change, so if you visit us again you may see a new tartan," she continued.

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Maxine recalls that when she got to the park, tartan sheep were a common theme for tourists.

She felt that it was only fair that she would continue the tradition so tourists, particularly Americans, would be really impressed. So, she posted a sign that explained that while the creatures are born normal, they turn a tartan color as they grow older.

Maxine recalls that when she got to the park, tartan sheep were a common theme for tourists.

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The sign also mentions that besides kilts the wool is used to make blankets and scarves.

It turns out that Maxine has been decorating the sheep ever since she bought the farm. She uses marker spray, which is the same kind used when animals are in a race or lambing. She tried hair dye in the past, and it worked well, but has recently gone back to using marker spray.

The sign also mentions that besides kilts the wool is used to make blankets and scarves.

Katielee Arrowsmith SWNS

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