Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

12 Bizarre Weight-Loss Methods From The Past.

Horace Fletcher believed that the best way to lose weight was to chew food 32 times.

In the early 1900s, Fletcher was known as "The Great Masticator," because he believed that if you chew your food instead of eating, you can enjoy the taste, and spit it out without gaining any weight. But obviously, this was just as bad as starving because the body wouldn't get the proper nutrients.

Horace Fletcher believed that the best way to lose weight was to chew food 32 times.

Lucky Strike and other cigarette companies claimed that smoking would lead to weight loss.

In the 1920s, these companies used this trick to get more women to start buying their products. The truth was that smoking was able to curb the appetite, but it also came with an increased risk of developing cancer, and those who tried to stop smoking noticed an increase in their weight.

Lucky Strike and other cigarette companies claimed that smoking would lead to weight loss.

The healthiest suggestion on this list was probably the belief that music was the key to a better health.

Wallace M. Rogerson, a medical expert from the 1920s, believed that in order to lose weight, you had to turn on the radio and dance the night and day away. Since dancing got people to move their bodies, it also allowed them to burn some serious calories too.

The healthiest suggestion on this list was probably the belief that music was the key to a better health.

In the 1920s, women were told that losing weight was as easy as taking a nice, relaxing bath.

La-Mar Reducing Soap claimed that it could do away with fat in areas like the ankles and under the chin. The outrageous claims were supported by a chemist who had no business talking about weight loss. Eventually, other brands started showing up in markets, but the only thing these soaps did was clean.

In the 1920s, women were told that losing weight was as easy as taking a nice, relaxing bath.

In the 1950s, women went to reducing salons full of creepy-looking machines to shed some pounds.

Instead of going to a beauty salon to get their nails done, women could get on machines that would stretch them, roll them over, and in some cases, electrocute them in order to do away with lumps of fat and an overall shape that they were trying to change.

In the 1950s, women went to reducing salons full of creepy-looking machines to shed some pounds.

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