Camila Villafañe

By Camila Villafañe

LifeBuzz Staff

Wild West Photos That Depict What Life Was Really Like.

Women Were Crooks Too

Women Were Crooks Too

Public Domain

Canadian Pearl Hart immigrated to a mining town in Arizona. But when the mine shut down, she also lost her job as a cook. Then she met an outlaw and the two embarked on a life of crime, which included stagecoach robberies. In her case, it was the last stagecoach robbery in recorded U.S. history. If you thought a road trip by car took forever, try taking one using a wagon.

The Roadless Road Trip

The Roadless Road Trip

Kansas State Historical Society/Public Domain

There weren't many roads in the 19th century, so thousands of Americans traveled from colony to colony from the East Coast and Midwest towards the west in search of other opportunities. In those days, families didn't have a lot, so they packed their belongings in a wagon and took off across the Great Plains. This family was photographed taking a lunch break before continuing to travel. Did you ever stop to think who photographed people in the Old West?

Photographing The Old West

Photographing The Old West

John C.H. Grabill/Public Domain

John C.H. Grabill was a former miner and prospector who went on a journey to the Northwest to document the lives of those in the American frontier with his camera. Grabill took 188 photographs between 1887 and 1892, which he submitted to the Library of Congress, and became the most prominent photographer in the Old West. If you love wolves, be grateful these settlers didn't succeed in making them go extinct.

Who Hunts The Hunters

Who Hunts The Hunters

John C.H. Grabill/Public Domain

From Central Mexico to the Greenland of North America, the gray wolf dominated this region. But when the European colonists got fed up with wolves attacking villagers and killing livestock, the colonists put bounties out on these creatures. The bounties continued until the 1930s, where wolves became more like big game trophies and less of a threat. Can you figure out when people from the Middle East first started migrating to the U.S.?

America's Melting Pot

America's Melting Pot

Public Domain

Throughout the 19th century, North America saw the infiltration of several celebrations and events that didn't come from European cultures. Among them was the art of belly dancing, which came from Egypt. In fact, belly dancers performed at the 1876 Centennial in Philadelphia, but gained even more publicity during the 1893 Chicago World's Fair. If you went back to the Old West and wanted a drink, you'd probably feel super welcomed at their bars.

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