Unhappy Customers Complained About THIS Sign Posted On KFC’s Door…

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This KFC Goes Blue

The presence of a uniformed officer may make you feel stressed out, angry, safe, or indifferent, depending on your individual or community experiences. The fact is the number of police officer deaths have gone up about 44% higher than at this time last year, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. Some of these officers were caught in the middle of racially charged battles while others were isolated incidents.

In some places, the increased violence, not just towards police officers but also towards the victims of hate crimes, have brought communities to come together in peace. In other places, however, it has just brought on more tension.

We see this divide on the issue from a gesture made in the small city of Gallipolis, Ohio, where a local KFC is offering free food to uniformed officers 'every day, all day.' The offer was advertised by a sign placed on the store window.

On the one hand, locals and officers have expressed gratitude towards the establishment for showing respect for those in blue. Others wrote on Facebook that the food should be offered to the needy. Several conservative sites have reported that this would 'probably' make Black Lives Movement supporters 'extremely angry' but such a response has yet to be confirmed and at this point, we can only assume that such statements are mere speculation.

Continue reading for more details and let us know what you think.


This Kentucky Fried Chicken in Gallipolis, Ohio, posted a sign in support of uniformed police officers.

Here's a closer look at what it says.

The reason behind this gesture is to show support for the peacemakers who keep the community safe.

A photo of the sign was originally posted on the Ohio Going Blue Facebook page.

Here's a comment from the admin, who argues that it isn't about the free food but the acknowledgement.

Ohio Going Blue / Facebook

This location is not the only one to offer free meals to officers.

Some people working in the food industry responded to the post on Facebook saying that their work offers the same service. One woman employed at a Taco Bell wrote about how she was proud to give officers meals on the house because they would help keep the peace when fights broke out at night.

Here's another example of a fast food establishment encouraging public support of police officers.

Ohio Going Blue / Facebook

Some folks are scratching their heads saying that police officers in their city aren't allowed to accept gratuities.

In some places, typically larger cities like NYC, officers discouraged from accepting gratuities like free meals because it may lead to corruption.

Where do you draw the line between special treatment and support?

As aforementioned in the first Facebook comment, some may argue that the reason for the sign is much less about the free food and more about the acknowledgement of the department's work, especially during times like this. What do you think?

Here's a look at what happened at another fast food restaurant.

In contrast, one police officer was denied service at a Noodles & Company in Alexandria. When she saw the officer, one of the cooks emerged from the back and informed the cashier, 'You better pull me off the line, because I'm not serving that.'. The cook and the cashier shared a laugh, and the officer left.

The company has since delivered a formal apology and terminated the two individuals involved.

Fox 5 DC

What's your opinion on establishments showing their support for officers with offers of complimentary meals?

If you support it, tell us why. If not, let us know your reasons or any alternatives you think could work out.

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