Family Of 6 Are Living A Cozy Life In The Arctic, Thanks To This Clever Glass Dome.

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The Hjertefølger decided that the best place to build their cob house was on the island of Sandhornøya in northern Norway.

It's not easy surviving inside the Arctic Circle. The weather outside is frightfully cold and definitely not delightful. In fact, your chances of survival in such harsh conditions are slim if you spend too much time there without shelter. But one Norwegian family decided to beat the odds and accept the challenge of living in the Arctic and they're not exactly roughing it either. Benjamin Hjertefølger and his wife Ingrid built a three-story cob house wrapped in a solar geodesic dome and it's the most self-sustaining property you'd ever want to live in ever.


It was designed in such a way that it would allow the loving family of six to live out their lives in sheer comfort, despite the horrible climatic conditions outside.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

The house is so ultra-green that it's any environmentalist's dream come true.

The family also has a means of growing their own food inside, which is ideal given that there aren't any Walmarts nearby.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

This self-sustaining dwelling was ideal for the family and their four children.

In fact, it kind of reminds us a bit of a Hobbit house inside a futuristic glass dome.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

The view outside is spectacular, particularly the night sky.

Fortunately, the single glazed geodesic dome helps protect the family from the harsh elements, including the freezing temperature and cool winds.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

It took the help of the family's friends and neighbors to move to this 3-story cob, super-sized Christmas tree ornament.

It's pretty much like every other home in the neighborhood. It's got the children's bikes tossed outside in the snow and everything. But there's something different when you walk in the house that other houses don't have, according to the Hjertefølgers.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

The couple has been living in this home for three years now and they love it.

Everything in the house works the way it was designed to, according to the Hjertefølger. Ingrid also added that the house seemed to have a soul of its own, making it feel personal because it was something she and her husband built.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

It wasn't easy building this paradise in the arctic.

The Hjertefølger had to design the home to withstand wind and extreme temperatures.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

Food was also an issue that they had to consider before moving in.

Growing crops in the winter in the arctic is virtually impossible to do. But even with the dome, growing food is tough because people here spend three months without any sun.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

The design of the house does allow the family to grow food five months longer than they could if they farmed outside.

You can expect to find apples, cherries, plums, apricots, kiwis, grapes, cucumbers, tomatoes, herbs, squash, and even melons among the various crops. Yummy!

Ingrid Hjertefølger

Nature house has literally become the ultimate eco-friendly dwelling.

The gray and black water is reused to water and fertilizing the plants. The family even uses food scraps as compost, and they always make sure to use biodegradable household products to reduce the risk of contaminants in the food that they grow and later eat.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

The home was designed to last, which is something the family hopes it will continue to do for years to come.

Benjamin pointed out that cob wood can potentially last "forever if you keep it dry". Fortunately, the home is covered by a glass dome, which shields it from the harmful effects of the weather.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

The best part of the home is that it's not a high maintenance structure, at least not when it comes to the wall.

Ingrid said that maintaining the wall's cob structure is relatively hassle free and there's really no need to paint it either, which is a plus.

Ingrid Hjertefølger

The Hjertefølgers pretty much designed their Nature House to meet virtually all of their needs.

But there is room for improvement. The family has stated that if they were to build a new Nature House, they'd add double glass to the greenhouse so that the garden would be tropical and not drip in the winter. Other than that, they've got everything they need from tranquility to happiness and self-sufficiency in every corner of the house.

Ingrid Hjertefølger