Stranger's Reply To Wrong-Number Text About A Dress Changes Family's Life.

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Tony Wood from Spring Hill, Tennessee received a text, but it was a wrong number.

Everything happens for a reason, or so they say. Many of us are skeptical about there being some sort of grand design to the universe. But then you hear miraculous stories which alter the way we think, and suddenly, we find hope in the world again. This is the story of Tony Wood from Spring Hill, Tennessee, who got a wrong-number text but decided not to ignore it. Instead, he decided to answer Sydney Uselton, who needed some positive feedback about a dress. What happened next led to a miracle that saved a child's life in the most unexpected way possible.


The text came from a woman named Sydney Uselton, who was in desperate need of a second opinion while she was dress shopping. Now Wood could have just ignored the text and went about his day as if nothing had happened. But he didn't do that.

Priscilla Du Preez / Unsplash

Uselton had tried on a black, formal gown, but she wasn't 100% sure about whether it was right for her.

She did what most people do these days and took a selfie while she was in the dressing room. Then she sent it through a text to one of her friends. The only thing is that she sent it to the wrong number and ended up reaching someone else.

Tony Wood

Wood knew that the young woman certainly needed some feedback on the black gown she picked.

He decided to lend her a hand and reply to the message and he did it with the help of his children. But he hadn't realized that his text response would have a serious impact on the lives of his entire family.

Tony Wood

He had gathered five of his six kids and took a photo with everyone giving her a few thumbs up.

Wood wanted to make sure that Uselton knew that the response wasn't coming from a friend, but that the person who replied wasn't some creep either. But since he couldn't get his wife's opinion, his kids became the fashion judges.

Uselton's friend, Mandi Miller, was touched by the text exchange that she decided to post it on Twitter.

As you can imagine, the text conversation between Wood and Uselton had gone viral because of the cute kids and the way Wood had so graciously offered to help Uselton. But there was one person missing from the photo, Wood's youngest child.

Twitter

The Twitterverse learned that Wood's youngest child wasn't in the photo for a very good reason.

Kaizler, who is four years old, is suffering from leukemia, and the reason why the mom wasn't home to offer Uselton her input on the dress was that she had taken Kaizler to his usual chemotherapy session.

Twitter

When Uselton's friend, Miller, learned of Kaizler's situation, she tweeted his GoFundMe page.

That act on its own led to retweet after retweet and a massive number of donations. In less than no time, thousands of folks had donated, and the Wood family realized the page had earned more than the $10,000 fundraising goal they had set up.

Tony Wood

Wood and his family were humbled by everyone's generosity, but Kaizler had a long road ahead.

On Twitter, Wood let people know that Kaizler had been eager to go to kindergarten, but he got sick and had to go the hospital to undergo treatment. And while his son had over a year's worth of treatments, he was doing okay so far.

Tony Wood

Wood considered it a blessing that people donated as much as they because money was tight.

Even though he worked very hard to make ends meet, the hospital bills were starting to overwhelm the family. But the Twitterverse showed compassion and they've even inundated Kaizler with letters from well-wishers offering him hope for a quick recovery.

Tony Wood

Kaizler's mother, Rachel Wood, is also grateful for the financial boost they received.

She just couldn't believe that a wrong-number text made such a huge difference. She also pointed out how awesome it is that those who donated proved that the world still has good people. And she honestly feels that their journey through this is only possible thanks to everyone's love and support.

Tony Wood